Nicaraguan States

A. its base through military in Honduras Pentagon military intelligence agents maintained close contacts both to carry out the policies as to keep track of all the political movements by all political actors. As Honduras is so heavily militarised has served as a major base for American military intervention in the region: in 1954 the coup was launched from Honduras successfully backed by the United States against the democratically elected Guatemalan President. The Cuban exile invasion orchestrated by the United States was launched from Honduras in 1960. From 1981 to 1989 United States funded and trained more than 20,000 in Honduras against mercenaries who formed the army of death squads to attack the democratically elected Nicaraguan sandinista Government. The United States-backed coup in Honduras demonstrates that, unlike in the early 1980s, when President Ronald Reagan invaded Grenada and President George Bush (father) invaded Panama, the situation and the political profile of Latin America (and the rest of the world) have changed dramatically. Through its support to the military coup, Washington reminds countries of Latin America United States still has the capacity to implement its policies through the Latin American military elites, it has already reaffirmed U.S.

political and diplomatic isolation in the hemisphere. The Obama regime is the only major countries that has kept its Ambassador in Honduras, the only country that refuses to consider the military coup as a coup, and the only one which maintains the economic and military aid. Conclusions: The real question is not whether Latin America has moved to the left but what far to the left has moved. The majority of Latin American Governments, one way or another have sought to distance themselves from the United States in one degree or another. American power in the world system, and in particular the concern of United States by wars that comes losing in the Middle East, they have dried the political energy that previously moved strongly in Latin America.

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